The Ins-and-Outs of Reconstituted Veneer

Metal, masonry, wood and plastic all have their place in design and styling. However, wood is often the go-to material for warmth and a friendly atmosphere. Residences, commercial buildings and furniture manufacturers all rely on wood to create a rugged look and welcoming ambiance.

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Until recently, man-made materials had one big advantage over wood; consistency. Each piece matched year in and year out. Reconstituted veneer brings consistency to any wood project, while still retaining the look and natural beauty of various wood species. According to Eric Cullen, Hardwood Veneer Superintendent of Timber Products Company, “Reconstituted veneer brings four very important attributes to the market; it's consistent and repeatable while maintaining availability and sustainability.”

Consistency and Repeatability

Lynn Campbell, Veneer Room Supervisor for Timber Products Company, emphasizes that "Reconstituted veneer is a repeatable wood." It is produced by taking standard veneer, dying it to the desired color and then gluing the layers back into a block. The block is then sliced into veneer that becomes the top layer of the final product. The layers of the block can be dyed various colors where needed to mimic a desired species of wood.

The result is a panel for an entire project that is similar in color and grain orientation with no defects to work around. The panels are repeatable across multiple production lots, which means if a panel becomes damaged, even years later, the replacement will match the original. Reconstituted veneer provides a uniform and maintainable look to any space that requires the look of a high-end wood species.

Availability and Sustainability

Because wood must be properly sourced and managed, exotic woods from responsible suppliers are increasingly expensive and hard to find. To address this, reconstituted veneer starts with common and abundant wood species like ayous, basswood, and poplar that is grown in managed forests or on plantations. Ayous has a looser grain typical of tropical species, while basswood and poplar provide a tighter grain. Instead of trying to find a reliable supply of rosewood, for instance, the same color and grain can be obtained by starting with ayous and dying it as needed. Likewise, basswood and poplar reconstituted veneer is used for North American species with tighter grains such as oak or maple.

Whether you are designing frameless European style cabinets or the entrance lobby of a hotel or casino, reconstituted veneer provides a high quality, warm and uniform look that cannot be duplicated in any other building product.

For more information, see our veneer options, or contact your salesperson to request a sample.

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