The Ins-and-Outs of Reconstituted Veneer

Metal, masonry, wood and plastic all have their place in design and styling. However, wood is often the go-to material for warmth and a friendly atmosphere. Residences, commercial buildings and furniture manufacturers all rely on wood to create a rugged look and welcoming ambiance.

Reconblog

Until recently, man-made materials had one big advantage over wood; consistency. Each piece matched year in and year out. Reconstituted veneer brings consistency to any wood project, while still retaining the look and natural beauty of various wood species. According to Eric Cullen, Hardwood Veneer Superintendent of Timber Products Company, “Reconstituted veneer brings four very important attributes to the market; it's consistent and repeatable while maintaining availability and sustainability.”

Consistency and Repeatability

Lynn Campbell, Veneer Room Supervisor for Timber Products Company, emphasizes that "Reconstituted veneer is a repeatable wood." It is produced by taking standard veneer, dying it to the desired color and then gluing the layers back into a block. The block is then sliced into veneer that becomes the top layer of the final product. The layers of the block can be dyed various colors where needed to mimic a desired species of wood.

The result is a panel for an entire project that is similar in color and grain orientation with no defects to work around. The panels are repeatable across multiple production lots, which means if a panel becomes damaged, even years later, the replacement will match the original. Reconstituted veneer provides a uniform and maintainable look to any space that requires the look of a high-end wood species.

Availability and Sustainability

Because wood must be properly sourced and managed, exotic woods from responsible suppliers are increasingly expensive and hard to find. To address this, reconstituted veneer starts with common and abundant wood species like ayous, basswood, and poplar that is grown in managed forests or on plantations. Ayous has a looser grain typical of tropical species, while basswood and poplar provide a tighter grain. Instead of trying to find a reliable supply of rosewood, for instance, the same color and grain can be obtained by starting with ayous and dying it as needed. Likewise, basswood and poplar reconstituted veneer is used for North American species with tighter grains such as oak or maple.

Whether you are designing frameless European style cabinets or the entrance lobby of a hotel or casino, reconstituted veneer provides a high quality, warm and uniform look that cannot be duplicated in any other building product.

For more information, see our veneer options, or contact your salesperson to request a sample.

Related Blog Posts

  • Onestep
    Get to Know: The One-Step and Two-Step Process

    Plywood panel construction is dictated by the needs of the customer, and with those needs come a slew of build requirements. At Timber Products Company, we look at these requirements and decide how best to manufacture the order so it meets the quality, appearance and price targets of the client. Once order specifications are met, the decision to go with a one-step or two-step construction is determined. But, what is the difference?

    Read More
  • Grantspass
    Mill Spotlight: Grants Pass, Oregon

    Located in Oregon, Grants Pass is one of our ten milling operations and rests 150 miles directly south of Eugene and 40 miles west of Medford. This facility employs roughly 170 people and produces our selection of hardwood and softwood plywood.

    Read More
  • Anti-dumping dispute
    Continued Challenges with Anti-Dumping

    Last year, more than half of the decorative and hardwood plywood products imported into the United States came from China. These products come into the country significantly below the U.S. market price because of the Chinese government’s questionable support of domestic hardwood plywood producers through tax breaks and discounts given to land and raw materials.

    Read More
  • Industry roundup
    Wood Products Industry Roundup

    Following up on the momentum generated in 2016, Timber Products Company is preparing to showcase its breadth of products at several events throughout 2017. As we prepare for another big year, we are looking back at the trends explored at 2016 events.

    Read More

Comments